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Sinop



Introduction of Sinop
Port and provincial capital of Sinop province in theN, on the Black Sea, approximately 187 mi NE ofAnkara. The area may have been first settled c. 1200b.c. On the site of an ancient city founded by Greekcolonists from Miletus in the eighth century b.c., itwas destroyed in the seventh century by Cimmeriansand was rebuilt to become politically and commerciallyimportant, on the route from the Black Sea tothe Euphrates River. It established numerous colonieson the Black Sea shores. It fell c. 185 b.c. to thekings of Pontus and became their capital and themost important port on the Black Sea. In the ThirdMithriditic War of 74 to 63 b.c., the Romans underLucullus took it and made it a free city. Sacked byPharnaces II, it was restored by Julius Caesar and under the Romans enjoyed great prosperity, whichcontinued under the Byzantine Empire.On the breakup of that empire in 1204 after theconquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade,it joined the Greek Empire of Trebizond. By1230 it was occupied by the Seljuk Turks, sultanateof Iconium, who brought about its decline. From c.1350 it belonged to the emirate of Kastamien.On November 30, 1853, a surprise attack and thedestruction of a large part of the Ottoman Empire'sfleet by a Russian naval squadron here helped bringabout the Crimean War. Much of the town was alsodestroyed. In March 1980 a defense agreement betweenTurkey and the United States placed Diogenes Stationhere, an important base of U.S. intelligence operations,operated under their joint control. Sinop was also thebirthplace of the Greek philosopher Diogenes and ofMithridates the Great of Pontus.Port and provincial capital of Sinop province in theN, on the Black Sea, approximately 187 mi NE ofAnkara. The area may have been first settled c. 1200b.c. On the site of an ancient city founded by Greekcolonists from Miletus in the eighth century b.c., itwas destroyed in the seventh century by Cimmeriansand was rebuilt to become politically and commerciallyimportant, on the route from the Black Sea tothe Euphrates River. It established numerous colonieson the Black Sea shores. It fell c. 185 b.c. to thekings of Pontus and became their capital and themost important port on the Black Sea. In the ThirdMithriditic War of 74 to 63 b.c., the Romans underLucullus took it and made it a free city. Sacked byPharnaces II, it was restored by Julius Caesar and under the Romans enjoyed great prosperity, whichcontinued under the Byzantine Empire.On the breakup of that empire in 1204 after theconquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade,it joined the Greek Empire of Trebizond. By1230 it was occupied by the Seljuk Turks, sultanateof Iconium, who brought about its decline. From c.1350 it belonged to the emirate of Kastamien.On November 30, 1853, a surprise attack and thedestruction of a large part of the Ottoman Empire'sfleet by a Russian naval squadron here helped bringabout the Crimean War. Much of the town was alsodestroyed. In March 1980 a defense agreement betweenTurkey and the United States placed Diogenes Stationhere, an important base of U.S. intelligence operations,operated under their joint control. Sinop was also thebirthplace of the Greek philosopher Diogenes and ofMithridates the Great of Pontus.

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